Hip 2B Holy, Review and Thoughts

I just finished watching Hip 2B Holy on Global, and all in all I thought it was a fair look at the rise of the evangelical movement in Canada. It was fairly interesting and informative. However as an atheist I have to say that I was hoping for more criticisms of the movement.

The documentary followed three seperate stories within the evangelical movement: youth pastor Nate Gerber, Connexus Community Church pastor Carey Nieuwhof (I’m sorry if I got the name wrong, please correct me if I did, I missed his name while watching and I had to go off the church’s website), and a couple where the woman is a devout Christian, and the man is an atheist.

The show opens with a Christian rave led by Nate Gerber. It’s a place where Christians can gather and dance and listen to hard rock and have a party without, I suppose, compromising their morals. Gerber represents the next generation of Christian leadership, and he’s bent on finding new ways to spread the message in a way that connects to youth. He seems like a cool guy, I can see where the appeal is to listen to what  he has to say. He’s passionate, energetic, he’s a good dancer and musician, and it also can’t hurt that he’s good-looking.

Next up is pastor Nieuwhof. His church, Connexus, takes advantage of modern technology to communicate the story of Jesus by moving his church into a multiplex movie theatre. Rather ingenious I have to say, and I imagine this helps the theatre out by selling popcorn and filling a space that would otherwise sit empty.

Nieuwhof seems reasonable enough. Obviously I don’t agree with the core of his message, my point of view being that the Bible is a work of fiction and I don’t believe in Jesus or god or heaven or hell. But I like  his approach to morality, in that he doesn’t deal in absolutes (except, it seems, on his anti-gay marriage stance). For instance, he doesn’t have a black and white stance on abortion, and believes that picketing abortion clinics is the wrong approach. I can definitely respect him for that.

The third story was that of the couple in which the man, I believe his name is Aaron but again, correct me if I’m wrong, is an atheist. He is devoted enough to his girlfriend that he attends her church, Connexus, even though he doesn’t believe in god or heaven or hell. Let me tell you, I really like Aaron. Of course I was cheering him on to stay logical, and was very happy at the end of the show when he declared that he still had no faith in god. Aaron was a great person to choose to represent atheists because he’s a friendly guy, clearly accepting of other peoples’ faith, and willing and open to learning about the Bible and about what people believe.

I think that the main purpose of Hip 2B Holy is to present to the public a picture of what this new evangelical movement in Canada, currently about 10-15% of the population, is setting out to achieve. Apart from finding new, more modern ways to preach, they have political aspirations as well. There was a group of students from Christian universities learning about how to present their arguments without the use of the Bible…what a novel idea! There was also a demonstration on Parliament Hill in which Christians were encouraged to pray for their MPs…maybe telling undecided voters about their platform would be a more useful approach, but to each his own. One of the prayers that gave me a chuckle went something like “pray lord that you’ll download to [the MP]”…how’s that for modernizing Christianity?

The Canadian evangelical movement is also in a race to define themselves before American fundamentalists spill over the border into Canada. Listen, anything to keep the fundies out. Hip 2B Holy showed a stark contrast between the mega-churches in the US, and those at home. I was pleased to see Nate Gerber’s apprehension when attending an event put on by American evangelists, which involved pyrotechnics, skateboarding, and a call for people to come to the stage and declare their faith. Even though I dislike evangelism as a rule, I’m thankful that the Canadian version is much more moderate than south of the border.

I wish that we lived in a godless world without churches and without religion, but we don’t. People will hang on to their irrational beliefs for dear life, and if they want to sink time and energy (and money)  into the type of Christianity portrayed in Hip 2B Holy, I can’t fault them. The evangelical movement within Canada is a new thing, so this was a god introduction to what these people are all about.

So 1o-15% of Canadians are a part of this new type of Christianity and they get a fair and informative show about them. Hopefully Global’s next project will be to profile people who fall within the 16% of Canadians with no religious affiliation (according to the 2001 census).

I just want to make a little disclaimer: It’s late. I wanted to write my thoughts on Hip 2B Holy while they were still fresh  in my brain, but I’m tired, so if this blog post doesn’t flow pardon me.

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22 Responses to “Hip 2B Holy, Review and Thoughts”


  1. 1 JP May 26, 2009 at 7:36 am

    Hi Lindsay,

    I have to say that i appreciate your thoughts on Connexus as I have been attending there since it’s inception and always wonder what people see us as when they have no connection to speak of. From your about page it seems to me that your still in the middle of this faith journey even though you declare yourself an atheist. I quickly (not fully) skimmed through some of your other religious subject blogs and have to side with you on some notes as it appears the “religiosity” of the church can be so shocking and hypocritical as well as down right alienating to people who don’t get where they are coming from. Even on Hip 2B holy there were scenes that made me cringe because people can act in a way that just makes them look like freaks instead of peace loving Christ followers.

    I’d also just like to clarify Connexus’ vision a little. (no I’m not an official spokesperson) What we are trying to do is scrape away all the religious crap that the church has imposed on people over the years. Things like forcing people to conform to certain stances on subjects like abortion, politics and other religious traditions that have lost their meaning in today’s society. Instead we have chosen to present what we believe as a solid truth to people in a way that they can relate to and understand. From this point on, the control is theirs. If they choose to accept it or not is totally up to them. It’s a personal spiritual conviction that no one else can impose on them. If through that personal spiritual journey they make choices about things like politics and abortion that’s totally up to them. Just like Carey’s choice on those subjects are totally his. He wasn’t imposing them rather just answering the question presented to him.(Please note I shouldn’t be speaking for Carey and if he reads this feel free to clarify my perceptions)

    At the end of the day we hope to establish a spiritual connection that’s personal with the God that we believe in. Not sit around and argue about whether or not He’s even there to begin with or take stances that alienate us from the rest of humanity.

    I don’t know Nate Gerber but it appears to me that his philosophy is very similar. On a personal note I loved some of the stuff he was doing.

    Lindsay, I wish you all the best in your journey. Keep up the good work on your blogs, keep asking questions and keep on pointing out the flaws in this religious world we live in. Believe it or not it’s people like yourself who help us Christians on our own journey. You actually help us to see things that we’ve forgotten to look at, or have even refused to look at.

    Peace.

  2. 2 Derek May 26, 2009 at 10:13 am

    If you don’t mind me asking, what is your stance on Christianity? You seem to know enough that Atheism as a choice label is actually one of the more illogical/irrational choices. Do you self-identify with it simply because it’s “considered” the opposite of Christianity? or because you whole heartedly are Atheist?
    Sorry i haven’t read too many of your other posts in case it’s clarified there.
    I actually didnt’ watch hip 2 b holy last night, but i read about it in the paper. I’m pretty surprised they missed one of the bigger church explosions in the gta, so in case you’re interested, check it out
    http://www.themeetinghouse.ca – the teaching pastor there is bruxy cavey

    i can’t vouch for connexus because i’m only listening to a sermon by Carrie right now for the first time, lol. but ya, anywho, hope to hear from you,

    Derek

  3. 3 Derek May 26, 2009 at 11:20 am

    i realize what i typed previously may have been a tad rude and all over the place, so i wanted to apologize, and i read your ‘about’ statement, and wish you the best as you continue to seek, i was in the same place as you not too long ago, although coming from the opposite end.
    take care, = )

    Derek

  4. 4 linzeebinzee May 26, 2009 at 6:17 pm

    Hi JP, thanks for stopping by! And thank you for clarifying the vision of your church.

    I just want to point out to you that I don’t feel like I’m in the middle of any faith journey. In my opinion, faith is not a virtue, and I now live my life on the basis of reason and evidence. There is no evidence for a god and no reason why a god is a necessary part of the universe, so why would I believe in one?

  5. 5 linzeebinzee May 26, 2009 at 6:40 pm

    Hi Derek, I’ve decided that I’m going to make a post outlining my history with Christianity and my journey towards atheism. It will be interesting for me to look back, and then I’ll be able to refer back to it when I get questions like yours, which I’m glad you asked. So that post will be coming soon!

    I just want to address a couple of things in your comment. First of all, by capitalizing the word ‘atheist’, you are implying that atheism is a name for a group of people with the same beliefs. However atheism is simply a word that means the absence of belief in gods. It is not a system of beliefs and it does not have certain principles by which to live by nor is it a club or a religion, it is simply a word that can be used to describe people who don’t associate themselves with a god or a faith or a religion.

    Second, I don’t call myself atheist because it is the opposite of Christianity or of any other religion. I have no personal beef with Christianity or any religion. Atheism to me is, as I said above, simply the absence of belief in gods. It’s not a position against anything.

    Do you go to the church that you linked to? I had a look at the website, and I’m curious, what does it mean by “pop spirituality”?

    I just have one more quick question…I’m not sure what you mean by this sentence: “You seem to know enough that Atheism as a choice label is actually one of the more illogical/irrational choices”…would you be able to re-word that for me?

    Thanks for stopping by, I appreciate your queries!

  6. 6 linzeebinzee May 26, 2009 at 6:41 pm

    It didn’t come off to me as rude at all! I welcome your questions and comments 🙂

  7. 7 JP May 26, 2009 at 9:59 pm

    Lindsay, We are all on a journey together. It starts at birth and appears to end when we die. Through that journey we discover things and establish our belief systems what ever they may look like. Your right I probably overstepped my bounds by stating you were on a faith journey but you are on a journey none the less.

    As for no evidence of God, I guess you know that I’ll beg to differ on that one. There are lots of words that we have invented over the years to try and describe unbelievable events. Words like “Luck” “Chance” “Odds”. We use these words on a regular bases to try and explain the unexplainable. Remove those words out of your vocabulary and you start to see where God just might show up in a day. Some would say that’s very suggestive and maybe it is. I guess what I’m trying to say is that if you look for evidence of God, you will find Him. If you choose to not look for that evidence, you probably won’t find Him. It’s kind of like archeology. They have to look in the right places and then dig deep so they can find what they are looking for. For me one is just as tangible as the other, whether your looking for God or the holy grail you still have to look.

    Later:o)

  8. 8 linzeebinzee May 26, 2009 at 11:05 pm

    “if you look for evidence of God, you will find Him”

    Well of course, if you want to find evidence for anything you can. That doesn’t mean it’s good evidence. Using your standard of evidence I could prove anything from the flying spaghetti monster to bigfoot, from psychic powers to homeopathy. It just doesn’t stand up to scrutiny.

    Looking for evidence for god is not like archeology. Archeologists find real evidence of ancient people.

    If suddenly loaves of bread started multiplying until they fed all of the starving children in Africa I would probably start believing in god.

    The little weird things that happen in life, the little coincidences and things aren’t evidence for anything.

  9. 9 JP May 27, 2009 at 5:55 am

    Lindsay,

    Have you ever truly looked for evidence of God?

  10. 10 linzeebinzee May 27, 2009 at 7:38 am

    When I was a Christian, I had faith in god. Faith means belief without evidence. I do remember looking at certain coincidences and certain things that happened and saying “there must be a god”. Coincidences are really cool, but they’re not evidence for anything except the existence of coincidences.

  11. 11 JP May 27, 2009 at 2:51 pm

    Coincidences are cool. They do exist and they are definitely unexplainable if you don’t believe that there is anything driving them. I’ve just lived through too many of them to think otherwise. Keep looking for the evidence, it’s there, you will find it, but you have to work at it.

    Peace.

  12. 12 linzeebinzee May 27, 2009 at 7:58 pm

    You’ve inspired me to write a blog post about coincidences, coming soon 🙂

    I don’t see any reason in looking for evidence. If there is an omnipotent god then he’s a dick so I don’t care to know him. What’s that Richard Dawkins quote…”The God of the Old Testament is arguably the most unpleasant character in all fiction: jealous and proud of it; a petty, unjust, unforgiving control-freak; a vindictive, bloodthirsty ethnic cleanser; a misogynistic, homophobic, racist, infanticidal, genocidal, filicidal, pestilential, megalomaniacal, sadomasochistic, capriciously malevolent bully.”

    But I welcome you or anyone to show me one solid piece of evidence that would convince me of the existence of a god.

  13. 13 JP May 27, 2009 at 8:40 pm

    I’m glad I’ve at least inspired you.

    Yes people have called God many different names over the years.

    And as for me personally showing you evidence of God, if you can’t see it all around you then I can’t really help you unfortunately. You have to choose to see it.

    It’s been nice chatting with you Lindsay. I wish you all the best on your journey.

    Peace.

  14. 14 Bene D May 28, 2009 at 2:21 am

    Thanks for inviting me over. This is an excellent summary and you paid a lot more attention to the show than I did.:^)

    Evangelicalism has a very rich history in Canada, and I think the show gave a fair representation of how big the tent is.

    Like you I found Nate and Aaron compelling, they tended to grab my attention and I think Connexus got a fair shake. It isn’t your grandfathers church, nor should it be, every generation turns their own page, and I think the shows producers were careful with that.

    I was pleased to see the brief contrast between traditional evangelicalism and NAR (the Parliament Hill crowd known as neo-pentecostal or New Apostolic Reformation) a belief system which follows the hybrid of fundamentalist/dominionism/reconstructionist faces we hear and see more from the US.
    It would be easy for an hour long show to miss the delineationand to play it for entertainment value.
    I’m glad they avoided that trap.
    To be fair again, along with traditional evangelicalism neo-pentecostalism has had a deep and until recently a mostly regional root in Canada. I think Hip 2b holy handled that well.

    I think Canadian evangelicals are already defined and healthier than the noisy portrayal we tend to hear from political and consumer segments and similar to believers in the UK, Australia, New Zealand.

    Blog on!

  15. 15 Pomo May 28, 2009 at 1:36 pm

    Hi linzee,

    Some thoughts, in no particular order, on your comments which I appreciated.

    1) Bible as fiction. The wealth of scholarship would say no, quite simply we don’t have a work of complete fiction. Many aspects are stories, but other aspects are historical. In fact, you can go to the extent of saying it is NOT historically trustworthy as some have written, but to say fiction is not doing your homework.

    2) I agree with your understanding of the main purpose of the documentary, however, I believe the number are very wrong. 15% is WAY too high (maybe in Alberta it works.) 8-10% max is about accurate. Furthermore I don’t see this movement bursting at the seems. It is holding steady (which means no decline so not so bad) at best.

    3) I would also say that evangelicals are NOT trying to come up with their own identity. The vast majority of all materials and perspectives come from American evangelicals and have for a very long time. Canadian evangelicals think like Americans, period. Given a more active political presence they’d soud the same too. That’s really the only difference, Canadians are far more apathetic.

    4) Finally you wish to live in a world in a godless and religious world? I woudln’t, it would suck….more so that is.

    Let’s just ring off a few actual ‘things’ the ‘church’ or Christianity has done in the past few hundred years….

    End of slavery in America, end of apartheid in South Africa, Mother Teresa, and pretty much all the hospitals in Canada (at the start).

    Not saying if everyone was Christian we’d be all way better off,but to dismiss contributions is a bit shortsighted.

  16. 16 linzeebinzee May 28, 2009 at 5:30 pm

    Thanks for stopping by 🙂 I’ll take Canadian evangelicals over American fundamentalists any day!

  17. 17 linzeebinzee May 28, 2009 at 6:16 pm

    Hi Pomo, thanks for your comments 🙂

    1) Just because a story has elements of true history doesn’t mean it’s not fiction. By the logic you used in your comment it would be inaccurate of me to say that the DaVinci Code is fiction, no?

    2) I took the numbers of 10-15% straight from Hip 2B Holy. Can you please tell me where your figure of 8-10% came from? If it’s accurate I would like to make an edit to my post.

    3) The show seemed to be strongly saying that Canadian evangelicals are making an effort to distinguish themselves from their American counterparts. I can’t pretend to know how Canadian evangelicals think, but I would say that the fact that Canadian evangelicals do not have an active political presence sets them apart from Americans significantly.

    4) Absolutely I would love to live in a godless world. I’m confident that freedom from superstition and dogma would lead to more scientific discovery, and less bigotry and discrimination.

    Firstly I’ll just say that just because Christianity has done some good things doesn’t make it right, and also it’s kind of pointless to be listing off things that Christians or Muslims or [insert ideology here]s have done for the world. People would do things to improve our situation here on earth without religion as well. You don’t need a god to be good.

    Second, I had a look at the Wikipedia for slavery in America and Apartheid and I couldn’t find anything saying that the church or Christianity were responsible for abolishing them. Please provide me with sources to back up your claims, I would be happy to look at them. Mother Theresa, I mean, well I’ll just refer you to this article: http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/259941/mother_teresa_not_as_good_as_you_think.html

    As for the hospitals in Canada, I don’t know much about their history so again I would be happy if you would provide me with a website that would back up what you’re saying so I don’t have to just take your word for it.

  18. 18 Global Villager May 28, 2009 at 11:31 pm

    hmmmm, I would also love to know how the church was involved in ending slavery, the apartheid etc.

    On the other hand, let’s list all of the events that religion has played a major role in that has lead to human misery and even death:

    The Inquisition
    Residenial Schools in Canada
    9/11
    Ongoing Middle East unrest
    Ongoing unrest in Ireland
    Taliban insurgency
    The Crusades
    Any war in Europe from 1500-1900
    ……..etc etc etc etc etc etc etc

    Bottom line is that a lot of bloodshed (not all) would have been avoided without the ridiculous strife caused by theological differences.

  19. 19 Pomo May 29, 2009 at 4:11 pm

    Woo hoo, a dialogue! And nobody is condemning the other! <– not sarcasm which I should highly because I was slammed on my blog for being sarcastic 😛

    1) Just because a story has elements of true history doesn’t mean it’s not fiction. By the logic you used in your comment it would be inaccurate of me to say that the DaVinci Code is fiction, no?

    I didn’t really have a logic presented, but I wouldn’t opt to go against the grain and state the entirety of the Bible is a gigantic story that never took place, in fact we have a wealth of archeological evidence to support.

    Funny you should bring up Da Vinci. That book was so popular. Why? Because people still have a fascination with Jesus. The thoguht of him having a secret wife plays heavily on our western mind. Let’s face it, Jesus is quite interesting, religion around him not so much.

    2) I took the numbers of 10-15% straight from Hip 2B Holy. Can you please tell me where your figure of 8-10% came from? If it’s accurate I would like to make an edit to my post.

    Reginald Bibby has tracked, using his own research, religious trends since the 70’s. His book from 2004 had 8% as the number. I also doubt evangelicals grew by 7% in 4 years–not a chance.

    3) The show seemed to be strongly saying that Canadian evangelicals are making an effort to distinguish themselves from their American counterparts. I can’t pretend to know how Canadian evangelicals think, but I would say that the fact that Canadian evangelicals do not have an active political presence sets them apart from Americans significantly.

    The show did! But that’s not what’s happening! Just look at the movie theater preacher, he said something like 90% is the same! The other guy isn’t doing normal evangelicalism, so he’s in the minority.

    4) Absolutely I would love to live in a godless world. I’m confident that freedom from superstition and dogma would lead to more scientific discovery, and less bigotry and discrimination.

    Is that so? Perhaps you’ve read into post-modernity and modernity? Modernity presupposes that the more we know, the more we rationalize, the more we discover, the more we figure out through science, all the ‘rational’ elements, the b etter off the world will be. THat was the notion since Kant (mid 1600’s i think).

    However, that idea that the more we know the better off we’ll be came to a crashing end after WW1 and WW2. The near annihilation of a people group and millions upon millions of deaths made people re think that ‘the more we rationalize the better off we’ll be’ idea.

    So in comes post-modernity and less value placed on what you can rationally conjure up in our non-unbiased (double negative) minds.

    Firstly I’ll just say that just because Christianity has done some good things doesn’t make it right, and also it’s kind of pointless to be listing off things that Christians or Muslims or [insert ideology here]s have done for the world. People would do things to improve our situation here on earth without religion as well. You don’t need a god to be good.

    Pointless? I listed some key elements that have forever changed western society. It doesn’t make Christianity right, but it asks the question of what is the driving motivation behind accomplishing the acts. Does a godless world point to people doing good to each other? Well that is another debate which would deal with the root of good and morality….

    Second, I had a look at the Wikipedia for slavery in America and Apartheid and I couldn’t find anything saying that the church or Christianity were responsible for abolishing them.

    I don’t really tie into church and Christianity all the time. I look at specific people who claimed a Jesus way. So racism/slavery = MLK, slavery = william wilberforce

    the instituted church (religion) has enough problem and we both could throw rocks at it all day….although i don’t know of a single institution that does more good. please provide me w ith evidence of one that does.

    Please provide me with sources to back up your claims, I would be happy to look at them. Mother Theresa, I mean, well I’ll just refer you to this article: http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/259941/mother_teresa_not_as_good_as_you_think.html

    Assuming the article is true, we all are human, and you are too, and the amount of good she did to impact the world and those she touched outweighs. But you can hate on her if you want….. 😛

    As for the hospitals in Canada, I don’t know much about their history so again I would be happy if you would provide me with a website that would back up what you’re saying so I don’t have to just take your word for it.

    Hmmm, no not really, just think of all the nuns who ran the first hospitals.

    @Global Villager

    hmmmm, I would also love to know how the church was involved in ending slavery, the apartheid etc.

    see above

    On the other hand, let’s list all of the events that religion has played a major role in that has lead to human misery and even death:

    religion sucks, there IS a marketed difference between religion and ‘Jesus movements’ (for lack of a better term, sorry for t he lame distinction).

    The Inquisition –> bad, how many people actually died though?
    Residenial Schools in Canada –> relaly bad
    9/11 –> islam
    Ongoing Middle East unrest –> everyone
    Ongoing unrest in Ireland –> catholics/prot
    Taliban insurgency –> islam
    The Crusades –> islam/christianity
    Any war in Europe from 1500-1900 –> any war?! are you serious, that’s not good history.

    ……..etc etc etc etc etc etc etc

    I would think not.

    Stalin killed more people than hitler in the name of secularism. Genocide in rwanda and turkey. destruction in cambodia and other african coutries.

    All points to the fact that people do a fine job killing each other for whatever reason. So since you don’ tbelieve in God, don’t blame him for something we choose to do.

  20. 20 linzeebinzee June 2, 2009 at 9:30 pm

    Hi, I just realized I didn’t respond to this so here goes…

    1) Archeological evidence for the Bible? Please provide sources.

    And of course there is still a fascination with Jesus…there are what, a billion Christians in the world? I personally don’t find him interesting.

    4) Yes, it is so. I haven’t read into post-modernity and modernity.

    “However, that idea that the more we know the better off we’ll be came to a crashing end after WW1 and WW2. The near annihilation of a people group and millions upon millions of deaths made people re think that ‘the more we rationalize the better off we’ll be’ idea.

    So in comes post-modernity and less value placed on what you can rationally conjure up in our non-unbiased (double negative) minds.”

    WTF? That’s all I have to say about that, sorry.

    And just a final thing on the whole religion is good because religious people do good things, my position is that there are good people in every walk of life, and it doesn’t take any gods for someone to be good. If someone is compelled to do the right thing, to lead a movement, to join a charity, they’ll do it regardless of their religion or lack thereof. People don’t do good because they think god will reward them in their afterlife. I think if there were no religions, we would have just as many people doing good as we do now. That’s my opinion, I can’t prove it.

  21. 21 Karen Pinker June 10, 2009 at 8:07 pm

    Hello all
    I am the Director of Hip 2B Holy. Just wanted to say that I am soooo pleased to read the debates on this blog. People are actually talking about belief and atheism with wit, intelligence, open minds and a willingness to engage. That’s exactly what Kevin and I hoped for: dialogue.
    Just to clarify a couple of minor points: we didn’t profile the Meeting House because A) in one hour, you have to keep a tight focus and b) the Meeting House is very well known and established and we were lucky enough to be around to watch Connexus open and develop.
    B) 15 percent vs. 8 percent. Battle of the statisticians!!! I have a great deal of respect for Reginald Bibby – but he looks at hard numbers of people who declare themselves in polling. We found – when we actually met up with real live human beings- that a lot of younger people don’t call themselves evangelical; heck they don’t tell pollsters that they go to church because they are experiencing their faith in very different ways in many instances. Also, folks like Carey Nieuwhof don’t call their church evangelical,so of course, they would not show up in stats. Andrew Grenville (who has been following evangelical Christians for a number of years) uses the 10 -15 percent number.And, finally, we did say near the top of the show that we were talking about “emerging” evangelicals.
    Karen (Pinker)

  22. 22 linzeebinzee June 10, 2009 at 9:28 pm

    Hi Karen, thanks so much for stopping by and leaving a comment!

    I’m glad you cleared up that stat. I found it hard to believe that there could be less than 10% of the population belonging to these evangelical churches. But that makes sense that a lot of them don’t call themselves evangelicals. I think that word tends to put people off because it’s descriptive of “in your face” type Christians. Here in Winnipeg we have many of these mega-churches, and I have lots of friends and family that are involved in them so from my anecdotal experience it seems like this is a movement that’s taking off.

    I was happy to see a documentary about this topic, because it’s something that’s new and kind of mysterious and in a way scary or intimidating to people on the outside looking in.


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